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Book Review: "The Misfortune Cookie" by Laura Resnick [Aug. 12th, 2014|12:03 pm]

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This is the sixth book in the Esther Diamond urban fantasy series, with an emphasis on humor and fun, rather than being dark like most of the urban fantasy out there. I've been enjoying this series since the first book and recommend it for someone looking for a light, easy break from typical urban fantasy out there.





The premise of this book: Esther's usual waitressing job is ended when the restaurant run and frequented by one of the mob families in the city is raided by none other than her on-again-off-again boyfriend Connor Lopez. Her mob friend and hitman Lucky goes into hiding in Chinatown and ends up calling Esther and Max when he suspects that one of the Chinese mobsters has been killed mysteriously . . . by a fortune cookie. Esther agrees to confront Evil once again, with Max at her side, and it has nothing--absolutely nothing!--to do with the fact that the mobster's son is making an independent film and suddenly needs a new leading lady.

As I said, I've been enjoying this series. It's light and easy to read and the characters are fun to follow around, especially when they get into the most bizarre and interesting situations. Lucky, Max, and Connor return, of course, and all of them end up playing a significant role as the plot unfolds and they start investigating the spread of these misfortune cookies. A good portion of the book is spent on the continuing relationship troubles between Esther and Connor, the main point here being that Connor has slept with Esther and yet HASN'T CALLED HER for over a week since. But Max and his magical talents are actually required in this book, and they are front and center, rather than being performed off to one side. And Lucky plays an important role in the resolution, as well as recognizing the Evil in the first place. We get the introduction of a new character with some fairly strong hints that he'll play a role in the next book. But I don't want to spoil anything here, so that's all I'll say.

I didn't rate this as highly as some of the previous books in this series because it isn't quite a strong in terms of plotline and development. I thought that far too much time was spent on the "hasn't called me yet" aspect of the relationship, but then I'm a guy, so perhaps I'm not tapping into the seriousness of this situation as much as I probably should be. But while reading, I reached the point where I said, "I get it, let's advance this part of the plot to another level, please." I also thought that the main plot regarding the fortune cookies, once it got started, kind of stalled out a little bit in the middle. For a long while, nothing happened with it, mostly because there was (initially) only the one misfortune cookie sent. However, once the second one appeared, the plot rocked from then on.

So, overall a good story and nice installment in the series. Certainly an enjoyable and fun read that doesn't discourage me at all in terms of reading the next book when it comes out. Not as strong as some of the previous books, but certainly much better than a slew of other humorous urban fantasies out there. If you haven't started this series, I suggest to start it now.
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New Releases: August 2014 [Aug. 7th, 2014|10:56 am]

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Ach! I'm late! Here are the new releases from DAW for August 2014, including new E.C. Blake, Stephen Blackmoore, and Irene Radford, along with the paperback of Jim C. Hines' latest. Which ones are you guys dying to get your hands on? Which ones have you (since I'm late) potentially already read? Let us know!

***************

First up is E.C. Blake's second novel in the Masks series called Shadows.





In Masks, Mara Holdfast’s life changed forever. As the daughter of the Autarch’s Master Maskmaker, she had a clearly defined future: a quiet, ordered life in the capital, making Masks with her father and doing work important to the ruling Autarch. But when her Mask, specially made by her own father, cracked and fell to pieces during her Masking ceremony, Mara was exiled from everything she once knew.

Now she has become part of an underground rebellion, rejecting the unjust rules of a Masked society. She must try to understand her unprecedented ability to use all types of magic--and to tear magic from the living bodies of those around her. But Mara has yet to discover just how horrifying her power can be. . . .

*****************

Next up, Stephen Blackmoore's latest dark urban fantasy, Broken Souls. This is a sequel to his previous book, Dead Things.





Sister murdered, best friend dead, married to the patron saint of death, Santa Muerte. Necromancer Eric Carter’s return to Los Angeles hasn’t gone well, and it’s about to get even worse.

His link to the Aztec death goddess is changing his powers, changing him, and he’s not sure how far it will go. He’s starting to question his own sanity, wonder if he’s losing his mind. No mean feat for a guy who talks to the dead on a regular basis.

While searching for a way to break Santa Muerte’s hold over him, Carter finds himself the target of a psychopath who can steal anyone’s form, powers, and memories. Identity theft is one thing, but this guy does it by killing his victims and wearing their skins like a suit. He can be anyone. He can be anywhere.

Now Carter has to change the game — go from hunted to hunter. All he has for help is a Skid Row bruja and a ghost who’s either his dead friend Alex or the manifestation of Carter’s own guilt-fueled psychotic break.

Everything is trying to kill him. Nothing is as it seems. If all his plans go perfectly, he might survive the week.

He’s hoping that’s a good thing.

*******************

Next, we have Irene Radford's latest Children of the Dragon Nimbus novel, The Wandering Dragon.





Now that Lukan has finally achieved journeyman magician status, he wants to escape from home, family, and the University Magicians. Needing a goal, he focuses on finding and rescuing his mentor, Master Robb. But Lukan has no idea what he will be facing. Gathering together a small band of friends to assist him, he sets out only to discover that while he can run away from his family, and all that is familiar, he can’t escape the problems that drove him away in the first place.

********************

And lastly, we have the paperback release of Jim C. Hines' The Codex Born, the second novel in his Magic Ex Libris series.





Five hundred years ago, Johannes Gutenberg discovered the art of libriomancy, allowing him to reach into books to create things from their pages. Gutenberg’s power brought him many enemies, and some of those enemies have waited centuries for revenge. Revenge which begins with the brutal slaughter of a wendigo in the northern Michigan town of Tamarack, a long-established werewolf territory.

Libriomancer Isaac Vainio is part of Die Zwelf Portenære, better known as the Porters, the organization founded by Gutenberg to protect the world from magical threats. Isaac is called in to investigate the killing, along with Porter psychiatrist Nidhi Shah and their dryad bodyguard and lover, Lena Greenwood. Born decades ago from the pages of a pulp fantasy novel, Lena was created to be the ultimate fantasy woman, strong and deadly, but shaped by the needs and desires of her companions. Her powers are unique, and Gutenberg’s enemies hope to use those powers for themselves. But their plan could unleash a far darker evil . . .

************

And those are the new releases from DAW for August 2014! Go forth and pillage the bookstore! (Or, rather, buy the books, since authors need to eat and things. *grin*)
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Book Review: "Chimes at Midnight" by Seanan McGuire [Jul. 24th, 2014|12:32 pm]

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This is the seventh book in the October Daye series by Seanan McGuire. This is a dark, urban fantasy series, with an emphasis on the dark, focusing on how the fae are living in their knowes adjacent to our more mundane real world. The series starts off a little rocky in my opinion, but has steadily been improving both in the quality and focus in the most recent books, starting with Late Eclipses (book four). This book continue that trend.





The premise here is that October is investigating the sudden appearance of goblin fruit on the streets, which is highly addictive to changelings and humans, so addictive it kills them. Once she has proof that multiple changelings have died from the addiction, she goes to the Queen of the Mists to get help with the problem . . . and is promptly banished from the realm, given three days to pack up and ship out. Now she's scrambling to save herself from eviction from faerie completely, her allies banding behind her, and the only option may be to depose the Queen.

Again, the quality of the books has increased steadily and this book was solid. The characters are, once again, engaging and the plot moves along at a swift pace. In earlier books, the plot and some of October's decisions were . . . well, rocky and sometime didn't make sense. Not so here (or in the previous few books). Seanan appears to have completely settled into this world and this character. Probably the best part of this book is how October finds her allies supporting her in her efforts, all of the actions in previous books coming into play to help her achieve her goal. Also great, October doesn't wallow in angst and being alone, nor does she hesitate to accept the help she's offered. In past books, she'd refuse help or shove it to one side, which was always annoying. As a character, she's grown, and this book brings all of that growth to the forefront. Also nice, some of the plot threads that were alluded to in previous books (such as the goblin fruit being a problem on the streets, and multiple other side comments) are finally pulled together and addressed. Not all of them, and there's obviously some loose ends in this book that need to be tied up, but many of them come together here.

So, overall, a great book in this series. One or two minor things were overplayed (the kissing of Tybalt got slightly annoying and also the reliance on the Luideag in the first part of the book) but those were, as I said, minor. I'm looking forward to the next book in this series, which should be out sometime this fall.
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Book Discussion: "How the White Trash Zombie Got Her Groove Back" by Diana Rowland [Jul. 24th, 2014|09:04 am]

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Time for the next book discussion! We're looking at the fourth novel in the White Trash Zombie series from Dianan Rowland, How the White Trash Zombie Got Her Groove Back. I've been enjoying this series and have this book on my short TBR list. How about you guys? Who's read it? What did you think?





Cover Copy: Our favorite zombie Angel Crawford has come a long way from her days as a pain-pill-addicted high school dropout with a felony record. After a year highlighted by murder, kidnapping, and the loss of her home, all she wants to do is kick back, relax, and maybe even think about college.

But when key members of the "Zombie Mafia" go missing, she has no choice but to get involved. Angel is certain Saberton Corporation is behind the disappearances, yet she can't shake the sense that a far deeper conspiracy is at work. With the small band of friends she can trust, Angel strikes out to track down the missing zombies.

From a seedy redneck bar in the backwoods of south Louisiana to a high society cocktail party halfway across the country, Angel claws her way through corporate intrigue, zombie drugs, and undead trafficking. In no time at all she's embroiled in kidnapping plots and hostage negotiations--though for once she's the one calling the felonious shots. Add some breaking and entering, criminal damage, and a wee bit of terrorism, and Angel's up to her undead ears in the kind of trouble she excels at.

But when unexpected danger threatens to destroy her, all the brains and bravado in the world may not be enough to keep her from going to pieces.
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Book Discussion: "Shattering the Ley" by Joshua Palmatier [Jul. 21st, 2014|10:24 am]

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Time for the next book discussion for the July releases! And it happens to be the second hardcover release this month, Shattering the Ley, by me, Joshua Palmatier. This is the first book of a new series, so if you've never read me before, now's your chance to get started. Here's the cover art and cover copy. If you've already read it, what did you think? And since I'm the author, if you have questions about the book (before or after reading it), just ask!





Cover Copy: Erenthrall--sprawling city of light and magic, whose streets are packed with traders from a dozen lands and whose buildings and towers are grown and shaped in the space of a day. At the heart of the city is the Nexus, the hub of the ley line system that fuels Erenthrall and links the city and the Baronial plains to the rest of the continent and the world beyond. The Prime Wielders control the Nexus, but it is the Baron who controls the Wielders and the rest of the Baronies through a web of brutal intimidation enforced by his bloodthirsty guardsmen--the Dogs--and his unnatural assassins--the Hounds. When a rebel group called the Kormanley seeks to destroy the power network and break the Baron's chokehold on the ley, two people find themselves caught in the chaos that sweeps through Erenthrall and threatens their entire world.

At the age of twelve, Kara Tremain thinks she knows what her life will be like after she finishes school: she'll work on repairing old clocks--both the mechanical ones and those powered by the ley--just like her father. But, drawn to Halliel's Park, called there by a low, persistent hum only she can hear, Kara learns that she can manipulate the ley, that she is a Wielder, destined for something far greater. Yet as she grows up and masters her abilities, she also uncovers the forbidden truth behind the ley lines, a truth that the Prime Wielders will do anything to keep hidden.

Allan Garrett wants nothing more than to be one of the Baron's Dogs. Charged with rooting out the Kormanley, he finds he has a talent for investigation. Yet the tactics of the Dogs are too brutal and vicious for his taste. But that revelation comes too late, for no one can leave the Baron's guards--once a Dog, always a Dog. As the terrorist attacks escalate, he finds himself trapped . . . even as he discovers he is the key to the secret that could shake the ley system to its core and destroy the Baron's tyrannical reign.

As both Kara and Allan become inextricably caught up in the political battles of the Barons and the Wielders, they are also sucked into the violent turmoil caused by the Kormanley. And they soon find that the city holds more mysteries and danger than they could possibly have imagined. As the tension between the Barons, the Wielders, and the Kormanley reaches its peak, Allan and Kara may prove the pivotal factors in Erenthrall's destruction . . . or its salvation.
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Book Discussion: "Elisha Magus" by E.C. Ambrose [Jul. 17th, 2014|11:14 am]

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Time for the first July book discussion. We have two hardcovers this month, so let's start with Elisha Magus by E.C. Ambrose, the second book in the Dark Apostle series. I enjoyed the first book in this series and can't wait to get to the second. What about you guys? Who's read it, and what did you think?





Cover Copy: Elisha, a barber-surgeon from the poorest streets of benighted fourteenth-century London, has come a long way from home. He was always skilled at his work, but skill alone could not protect him on the day that disaster left his family ruined and Elisha himself accused of murder. With no other options, Elisha accepted a devil's bargain from Lucius, a haughty physician, to avoid death by hanging--by serving under the sadistic doctor as a battle surgeon of the king's army, at the front lines of an unjust war.

Elisha worked night and day, both tending to the wounded soldiers and protecting them from the physician's experiments. Even so, he soon found that he had a talent for a surprising and deadly sort of magic, and was drawn into the clandestine world of sorcery by the enchanting young witch Brigit--who had baffling ties to his past, and ambitious plans for his future. Yet even Brigit did not understand the terrible power Elisha could wield, until the day he was forced to embrace it and end the war . . . by killing the king.

Now, Elisha has become a wanted man--not only by those who hate and fear him, but by those who'd seek to woo his support. Because, hidden behind the politics of court and castle, it is magic that offers power in its purest form. And the players in that deeper game are stranger and more terrifying than Elisha could ever have dreamed.

There are the magi, those who have grasped the secrets of affinity and knowledge to manipulate mind and matter, always working behind the scenes. There are indivisi, thought mad by the rest of the magical world: those so devoted to their subject of study that they have become "indivisible" from it, and whose influence in their realm is wondrous beyond even the imaginations of "normal" magi. And then there are--there may be--the necromancers, whose methods, motives, and very existence remain mysterious. Where rumors of their passing go, death follows.

But death follows Elisha, too.
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Book Review: "Alien in the House" by Gini Koch [Jul. 17th, 2014|11:00 am]

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This is the seventh book in the Alien series from Gini Koch. I'm desperately trying to catch up on this series, since the books are fairly large in size and she's producing them at two per year. I'm now two books behind, but hope to catch up before the tenth one comes out at the end of the year. This is a fun, action-packed quasi-SF series, with some romance elements thrown in. But in the recent novels, the romance aspects have taken a back seat, which makes the books much more appealing to me. Not that I hate romance, but I'm much more interested in the SF aspects. And of course the fun.





In this book, Kitty Martini and crew host a party for the DC elite, since they're now part of the Diplomatic Corps, and of course one of the newest Representatives in the House (and an Alien sympathizer) is murdered almost immediately. Everyone at the party is a suspect . . . except everyone who's anyone is at the party, so it doesn't narrow down the list much. But as Kitty begins to investigate, they discover that an unhealthy number of Representatives have been "accidentally" killed during the past year, and the deaths are escalating. When Jeff is asked to replace the Representative killed at the party, he becomes one of the targets. Now Kitty must find out who's behind the killings before they have a chance to kill anyone else. But in the process, she finds out that maybe there's really one Mastermind behind not just the deaths in the House, but perhaps all of the conspiracies she's uncovered since she killed her first Superbeing with hairspray and a pen.

Again, this series is really just good old fashioned rollicking fun. It's fast-paced, with conspiracies oozing out of every opening, bad guys (some thought dead) appearing around every corner, assassins on every rooftop, and SF elements that are more along the lines of the 50s B movies than hardcore science. Not that it's all fluff. You have to keep your brain engaged so you can follow all of the unraveling plotlines. For a brief time in this series, those plot threads were far too complicated to follow, but this book and the most recent ones have backed off on the complexity a little, and I think they're better books for it. Focusing in one a few of the ongoing conspiracies, while keeping the others in the background, makes for better reading and gives the reader more focus.

This book has a pretty clear plotline, easy to follow, with only a few side elements that confuse the matter in the beginnings. Basically, those are the red herrings. I enjoyed the murder mystery here, as well as the added thriller aspects introduced because of the plot; it starts to feel like a political suspense novel with the politics, assassins and conspiracies. So it has a slightly different flavor than the previous books, which is good. My biggest issue with the plot is that I felt it took far too long for the characters to figure out the reason why the Representatives were being killed. It seemed obvious to me what the reason would be almost from the start, and yet Kitty and crew don't figure it out until well after the halfway point, and then they take even longer trying to convince others that this is the reason when those other people should have realized it much sooner as well. It was a little hard to believe some of the characters took that much prodding to convince.

But, aside from that, I loved the noir-ish, suspense feel of the book, especially the political assassination aspects. The romance elements in the book were extremely light, which I like, but I know some of you will be disappointed with. I think it's one of the better of the recent books in the series. If you're looking for some action-packed SF with romance on the side, check this series out.
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Book Discussion: "Blood Pact" by Tanya Huff [Jul. 14th, 2014|08:50 am]

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The next book discussion is for the trade release of Tanya Huff's popular Blood series, Blood Pact. This is the last of the June releases, and then we'll start up the July ones. I'm pretty sure a ton of people have read this book already. So what did you think?





Vicki Nelson has received the call that no daughter ever wants to receive--that her mother has died. Marjory Nelson’s coworkers at the Queen’s University Life Science Department told her that she suffered a heart attack, and that they’d be waiting for Vicki to arrive in Kingston to make the funeral arrangements. But what begins as a personal tragedy turns into the most terrifying case of Vicki’s career, when her mother’s body disappears mysteriously from the funeral home. Someone at the University is determined to learn the secret of life after death . . . and they’ve decided to make Vicki’s mother part of their horrifying experiments.
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Book Review: "Green Rider" by Kristen Britain [Jul. 3rd, 2014|02:00 pm]

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This is the first book in Kristen Britain's Green Rider series from DAW Books and I'm not sure why it took me so long to get around to reading it.

Karigan is a student at a school for the wealthy and elite because her father is a successful merchant. But after a sword fight with another student--an aristocrat's son--where she humiliates him, she finds herself in hot water . . . so she runs away. Or rather, she runs from the school, intent on returning home. However, as soon as she leaves she stumbles over a Green Rider, one of the messengers of the king, who's near death. The Rider charges her with getting his messages back to the king, directly into the king's hands, and before Karigan knows it, she's one the Green Rider's horse, fleeing those who killed the Rider and are intent on stopping her from delivering the messages no matter what.

That description pretty much covers only the first few chapters of the book, so as you can imagine, the rest of the book is what Karigan runs into on her adventures to find the king. But even that isn't the end of it, because there are consequences once the message is delivered. Overall, I enjoyed the book. Karigan is a young protagonist and the adventures she has were engaging. This is Kristen Britain's first book and it does suffer somewhat from that "first book" syndrome in that the beginning felt a little rough (her running into the Rider and accepting the charge of delivering the message felt a little awkward). Also, some of the adventures after that also felt a little random and rambling, not as focused as I'd expect. I also expected the bad guys to play a more significant role in the first half of the book. Instead, they appear occasionally, are made out to be extremely powerful, but then don't really come into play until the latter part of the book. I would have thought the first half would have been more focused on the bad guys attempting to capture Karigan.

But that said, the world was interesting and it's obvious that there is more story here to explore. I've been told that some of the issues I listed above are fleshed out in more detail in later books, so I'll have to see if they have satisfactory explanations when I get to those later books. Overall an enjoyable read, perhaps a little rambling, with some characters and choices made that didn't seem quite right or were a little too oblivious and unreasonable given the circumstances. But I expect that the story and writing will grow appreciably in the follow up books, which I will, indeed, read.



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New Releases: July 2014 [Jul. 1st, 2014|09:25 am]

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Time for the July new releases from DAW Books Inc.! We've got two new hardcovers this month, from E.C. Ambrose and Joshua Palmatier. *coughcough* We've also got the new White Trash Zombies novel from Diana Rowland, along with the paperback release of Tad Williams' last Bobby Dollar novel. So plenty to keep all of you DAW fans reading. Which ones are you dying to get your hands on? Let us know!

************************

First up is E.C. Ambrose sophomore novel, Elisha Magus, the second book in her Dark Apostle series.





Elisha, a barber-surgeon from the poorest streets of benighted fourteenth-century London, has come a long way from home. He was always skilled at his work, but skill alone could not protect him on the day that disaster left his family ruined and Elisha himself accused of murder. With no other options, Elisha accepted a devil’s bargain from Lucius, a haughty physician, to avoid death by hanging--by serving under the sadistic doctor as a battle surgeon of the king’s army, at the front lines of an unjust war.

Elisha worked night and day, both tending to the wounded soldiers and protecting them from the physician’s experiments. Even so, he soon found that he had a talent for a surprising and deadly sort of magic, and was drawn into the clandestine world of sorcery by the enchanting young witch Brigit--who had baffling ties to his past, and ambitious plans for his future. Yet even Brigit did not understand the terrible power Elisha could wield, until the day he was forced to embrace it and end the war . . . by killing the king.

Now, Elisha has become a wanted man--not only by those who hate and fear him, but by those who’d seek to woo his support. Because, hidden behind the politics of court and castle, it is magic that offers power in its purest form. And the players in that deeper game are stranger and more terrifying than Elisha could ever have dreamed.

There are the magi, those who have grasped the secrets of affinity and knowledge to manipulate mind and matter, always working behind the scenes. There are the indivisi, thought mad by the rest of the magical world: those so devoted to their subject of study that they have become “indivisible” from it, and whose influence in their realm is wondrous beyond even the imaginations of “normal” magi. And then there are--there may be--the necromancers, whose methods, motives, and very existence remain mysterious. Where rumors of their passing go, death follows.

But death follows Elisha, too.

**************************

Next up is the release of Shattering the Ley, the first book in a new series by Joshua Palmatier. *coughcough*





Erenthrall--sprawling city of light and magic, whose streets are packed with traders from a dozen lands and whose buildings and towers are grown and shaped in the space of a day.

At the heart of the city is the Nexus, the hub of a magical ley line system that powers Erenthrall. This ley line also links the city and the Baronial plains to rest of the continent and the world beyond. The Prime Wielders control the Nexus with secrecy and lies, but it is the Baron who controls the Wielders. The Baron also controls the rest of the Baronies through a web of brutal intimidation enforced by his bloodthirsty guardsmen and unnatural assassins.

When the rebel Kormanley seek to destroy the ley system and the Baron’s chokehold, two people find themselves caught in the chaos that sweeps through Erenthrall and threatens the entire world: Kara Tremain, a young Wielder coming into her power, who discovers the forbidden truth behind the magic that powers the ley lines; and Alan Garrett, a recruit in the Baron’s guard, who learns that the city holds more mysteries and more danger than he could possibly have imagined . . . and who holds a secret within himself that could mean Erenthrall’s destruction--or its salvation.

**********************

Next up, the newest White Trash Zombie novel from Diana Rowland, How the White Trash Zombies Got Her Groove Back.





Our favorite zombie Angel Crawford has come a long way from her days as a pain-pill-addicted high school dropout with a felony record. After a year highlighted by murder, kidnapping, and the loss of her home, all she wants to do is kick back, relax, and maybe even think about college.

But when key members of the “Zombie Mafia” go missing, she has no choice but to get involved. Angel is certain Saberton Corporation is behind the disappearances, yet she can’t shake the sense that a far deeper conspiracy is at work. With the small band of friends she can trust, Angel strikes out to track down the missing zombies.

But when unexpected danger threatens to destroy her, all the brains and bravado in the world may not be enough to keep her from going to pieces.

************************

And lastly, we have the paperback release of Tad Williams' Happy Hour in Hell, with a brand new cover!





I’ve been told to go to Hell more times than I can count. But this time I’m actually going.

My name’s Bobby Dollar, sometimes known as Doloriel, and of course, Hell isn’t a great place for someone like me--I’m an angel. They don’t like my kind down there, not even the slightly fallen variety. But they have my girlfriend, who happens to be a beautiful demon named Casimira, Countess of Cold Hands. Why does an angel have a demon girlfriend? Well, certainly not because it helps my career.

She’s being held hostage by one of the nastiest, most powerful demons in all of the netherworld--Eligor, Grand Duke of Hell. He already hates me, and he’d like nothing better than to get his hands on me and rip my immortal soul right out of my borrowed but oh-so-mortal body.

But wait, it gets better! Not only do I have to sneak into Hell, make my way across thousands of miles of terror and suffering to reach Pandemonium, capital of the fiery depths, but then I have to steal Caz right out from under Eligor’s burning eyes and smuggle her out again, past demon soldiers, hellhounds, and all the murderous creatures imprisoned there for eternity. And even if I somehow manage to escape Hell, I’m also being stalked by an undead psychopath named Smyler who’s been following me for weeks. Oh, and did I mention that he can’t be killed?

So if I somehow survive Hell, elude the Grand Duke and all his hideous minions and make it back to the real world, I’ll still be the most hunted soul in Creation. But at least I’ll have Caz. Gotta have something to look forward to, right?

So just pour me that damn drink, will you? I’ve got somewhere to go.

*************************

And those are the newest DAW books for the month of July! Come back to discuss them as the month progresses during out book discussions. But first, go forth to thy bookstore and raid, pillage, and plunder!
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